Anyone who’s been through a divorce will likely readily admit that it takes an emotional toll on them. Ending a relationship with someone that you’ve been involved with is inevitably difficult. What you often don’t hear, though, are stories about the financial toll that a divorce takes on them. It can take a pretty significant one on your credit.

Although it would seem to make sense that it would, the sheer process of getting divorced doesn’t ruin your credit score. In fact, whether you’re married or not has no impact on it. Even still, a divorce can adversely impact your credit score for two reasons.

If you share joint accounts with your ex, then these will remain on your credit report. If one of you allows them to become delinquent, then this can affect the other. If you can work out an agreement with your ex as to how to divide up responsibilities for paying outstanding bills, then you may be able to keep things from spiraling out of control.

Divorce can also ruin your credit simply because creditors aren’t required to honor your divorce decree. This means that liabilities that your spouse racked up during your marriage will also become yours. They’ll expect for payments to continue to be made or they’ll come after you both, regardless of what your divorce decree says about who gets to keep your Florida home or a car.

Data recently published by the U.S. Census Bureau shows that women often report making less income than their male counterparts in the year following a divorce.

Researchers at Experian also recently published a study that sheds light on the impact of marriage and divorce on credit scores. They found that as high as 54 percent of divorced women admitted that their scores decreased during their marriages. At least 50 percent said that they felt as if their ex was responsible for ruining their credit.

Navigating finances when you and your ex’s communication abilities are at an all-time low is likely difficult. A divorce attorney can help you reach an agreement with your ex about how to handle your Kissimmee marital property, assets and debts so that you’re not left in any worse of a financial situation than you have to be in.