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When is supervised visitation ordered in a custody case?

In most cases, a judge will want to give both parents every opportunity possible to spend quality time with their kids. In instances in which a parent has been known to have a substance abuse problem or has been accused of abuse or domestic violence, though, a judge may deem it to be in the child's best interest for him or her to be supervised during visitation.

Supervised visitation generally involves both the parent and child being monitored by a social worker or another appointed family member. Supervised sessions often take place at either a parent's home or a third-party location, such as a mental health counselor's office.

Once ordered, visitation under supervision may be required indefinitely until all accusations are followed up on or potential risks are done away with. The only way the order may be updated to allow for unsupervised visitation is if the parents return to court to have those conditions dropped.

In the case of a parent with a drug problem or alchohol dependency, it may be necessary for him or her to demonstrate his or her completion of a substance abuse rehabilitation program to regain unsupervised vistation. Additionally, they may be required to submit to regular testing and maintain their sobriety for a period of time before their visitation rights are restored.

While the idea of supervised visitation may seem overbearing for the parent subjected to it, court systems see it as the ideal option to allow a child and his or her mom or dad to maintain an uninterrupted relationship. It also is seen as the best way to ensure that the child is exposed to as little harm as possible.

If your ex is known to be violent or have substance abuse issues, then a Kissimmee, Florida, divorce attorney may advise you of the advantages of asking a judge to institute supervised visitation in your custody case.

Source: The Spruce, "What is supervised visitation?," Jennifer Wolf, accessed Dec. 22, 2017

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